Deep Web Tech Blog

Signs of Spring – Pollen Allergies!

March 20th marked the first day of spring. Here in northern New Mexico we have seen signs of spring (and allergies) for over a month. The crocus stretched out of the soil in February marking both a celebratory moment for my family, and one of concern.  The weather is already warm and beautiful causing the apricot, plum, and juniper trees to bloom like mad. But because they’ve bloomed so early, will a late freeze wipe out our delicate fruit?  And will we all sniffle and sneeze longer from the thick pollen collecting on our cars and sidewalks?

My questions took me to three different federated search engines to see if I could see what “spring” topics were circulating.

On Biznar, a social media and business search engine, I couldn’t help but search out how others were handling their spring allergies. Some dive into the Claritin box, while others go for a Kettlebell workout.  My family claims to have zero allergies, although we slyly keep a tissue box handy once the juniper pollen begins to circulate.  However, it looks like some research indicates that dairy may offer relief.  I shall eat more yogurt from here forth.

Speaking of pollen, Environar, a federated search portal dedicated to life, medical and earth sciences, had ePollen Allergy Forecast for SANTA FE  NM  87501    Pollen.comxcellent research on pollen through the ages.  Pollen has been used to document climate cycles, and indicate many other factors such as temperature and precipitation during the past 140,000 years or so.  Pollen, atchoo!, is scientifically important.

I particularly enjoyed browsing the government portal, Science.gov, on the effects of climate change on allergies.  I thought this interesting from the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found in PubMed regarding a survey on climate change and health: “A majority of respondents indicated they were already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients, most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (77%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (58%), and severe weather injuries (57%).”  I shall buy more tissue.

While my questions may not have precise answers, I can at least plan ahead at the grocery store when I see high pollen counts – yogurt and tissues.  And perhaps I’ll have a new appreciation for the contributions pollen has made to our scientific community.

Explore your Pollen Allergy Forecast at Pollen.com:  http://www.pollen.com/allergy-forecast.asp.  Happy Spring and Happy Searching!