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Monthly Archive for: ‘July, 2015’

The NHS aims to provide a wide range of free health services in response to the needs and requirements of the population.

This event is free to all health librarians. DWT, as one of the event sponsors, will have an opportunity to present how Explorit Everywhere! applications further search and discovery in the healthcare industry.

Venue:
University Hospital, Coventry, United Kingdom
Friday, 11 September 2015 from 10.00 to 16:00 (BST)
More Information…

If you plan on attending the conference and would like to meet with Abe, please let us know as soon as possible. His schedule is quickly filling up!

  • Deep Web Technologies Announces Major Upgrade To Explorit Everywhere!

    SANTA FE, N.M., July 28, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Deep Web Technologies (DWT), a leader in federated search, announced a major upgrade to Explorit Everywhere! next-generation search technology. Explorit Everywhere! searches internal, subscription and public Deep Web sources simultaneously for relevant results, helping organizations improve their research efficiency and ultimately driving down research costs.

    The new Explorit Everywhere! release rebuilds the previous version from the ground up, laying a strong foundation for future enhancements. Now, as a platform-driven service, Explorit Everywhere! provides greater agility in support of different services and features, including search widgets, suggestion services, mobility and scalability. The web-based Explorit Everywhere! allows DWT to apply updates at the platform or customer level, creating a fluid, efficient workspace and consistent applications. “The versatility of Explorit Everywhere! lets my team complete multiple updates faster, and spend more time serving customers with tailored applications, or even creating new features,” said Ellee Wilson, Vice President of Professional Services at DWT. “It really opens the imagination to what is possible at DWT.”

    Explorit Everywhere! federated search initially gained traction in the government sector, but has since branched into the corporate, medical and academic markets. These markets, with their unique search needs, helped to define the new Explorit Everywhere! upgrade. With its web-based approach, Explorit Everywhere! is accessible anywhere and everywhere users search for information. Abe Lederman, CEO and CTO at DWT mentioned, “I’m pleased with the direction Explorit Everywhere! has taken. With this upgrade, we are well-positioned to provide innovative solutions across a range of industries.”

    New functionality in Explorit Everywhere! includes the MyLibrary feature, letting researchers select and save results to their personal accounts. MyLibrary allows users to tag and categorize selected results, similar to organizing folders in a filing cabinet. Users can reference their saved results whenever they want, for as long as they are saved in their application.

    Incorporating Deep Web Technologies’ bedrock multilingual search technology, Explorit Everywhere! now lets users switch their user interface text to their language of choice: English, German, French, Portuguese or Spanish. When users select their query language to search across multilingual databases, the user interface will automatically update the user interface text to that language as well. Combining multilingual searching and user interface localization creates a seamless experience for researchers at global companies requiring, for example, local or foreign competitive intelligence, news or science in their own language.

    Explorit Everywhere! is also now completely mobile, using elements of responsive design to formulate a device-driven user interface. With over 100 device screen resolutions worldwide and growing, Explorit Everywhere! detects the screen resolutions users are coming from, and fits the content to the screen of the device, ensuring results are easy to view, sort and interact with, whether viewed from a tablet, phone or desktop computer.

    Lederman said, “There really is no limit to where Explorit Everywhere! can go. We’re exploring possibilities I would never have dreamed of before, and we’ll continue to enhance our product capabilities to benefit our customers and to demonstrate our search expertise.”

    About Deep Web Technologies

    Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com) creates custom, sophisticated federated search solutions, based on its Explorit Everywhere!™ service, for clients who demand precise, accurate results. It is the tool of choice when needing to access the Deep Web, a collection of Internet information sources that are generally not accessible to web spiders or crawlers and cannot, therefore, be indexed for search by popular search engines such as Google, Yahoo! or Bing. Explorit performs real-time searches of multiple information sources, in parallel, merging the results into a single page. Serving Fortune 500 companies, the Science.gov Alliance, the U.S. Department of Energy, Stanford University, the WorldwideScience Alliance and a wide variety of other customers, partners and research and library alliances, Deep Web Technologies has built a reputation as the “researcher’s choice” for its advanced, agile information discovery tools.

    Media Contact:
    Darcy Pedersen
    Deep Web Technologies
    505.820.0301
    Email

    SOURCE: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/deep-web-technologies-announces-major-upgrade-to-explorit-everywhere-300118988.html?tc=eml_cleartime

  • Navigating the World of Explorit Everywhere!

    As much as we like to think that Explorit Everywhere! is simple to use, it still holds the junior heavyweight championship title for feature-rich technologies. Throw on top of that the concepts of “federated search”, “Deep Web”, and “discovery services”, and it’s easy to get lost in a maze of information. Since Deep Web Technologies is all about pulling the needle out of the haystack for you, we thought it was time to create an easy reference post on the world of Explorit Everywhere!. Want to know where you can find out about how we rank results? How about federated search or the Deep Web? Take a gander through some of these posts:

    Explorit Everywhere! Features

    Federated Search

    The Deep Web

    Discovery Services

    Multilingual Searching

    You may also enjoy reading this post from the Federated Search Blog enumerating informational posts about federated search and discovery services. A couple of key posts include:

     

  • WorldWideScience.org 2015 Enhancements

    WorldWideScience.org has received a tremendous amount of press so far in 2015. On January 8th, Microsoft published a case study on WorldWideScience.org and Deep Web Technologies:

    “WorldWideScience.org is the result of years of research and innovation. Although the underlying technology itself is exciting, published an article entitled, “Advancing Science by Overcoming Language Barriers.” The article discussed the rise of WorldWideScience.org and its role in bridging language barriers using Microsoft’s machine translation.

    In late June, Deep Web Technologies updated WorldWideScience.org, just in time for the WorldWideScience Alliance meeting in Germany. Responsive design is now an integral part of the application making it much easier to add new features now and in the future. The spotlight enhancements include:

    1. Mobility: WorldWideScience.org is now mobile and can now be accessed from any device. When a user goes to the application on a mobile device, the interface will automatically adjust to their screen size, making it easier to search and view results.
    2. Localization: While WorldWideScience.org has been a multilingual application for years, allowing users to translate results into their language of choice, now, when a user chooses English, Spanish, French or Portuguese, WorldWideScience.org will automatically update the interface text to the selected language too.

    There are a host of other small improvements to WorldWideScience.org. This upgrade is setting the stage for future enhancements such as MyLibrary, the ability to save results for future reference, and additional language localizations. Take a look from your smartphone or tablet and let us know what you think!

    WorldWideScience.org isn’t the only application recently updated. Science.gov received a facelift recently as well.

  • Relying on Google for Science Information is Bad for Your Health

    People tend to think of Google as the authority in search. Increasingly, we hear people use “google” as a verb, as in, “I’ll just google that.” General users, students and even professional researchers are using Google more and more for their queries, both mundane and scholarly, perpetuating the Google myth: If you can’t find it on Google, it probably doesn’t exist. Google’s ease of use, fast response time and simple interface gives users exactly what they need…or does it?

    Teachers say that 94% of their students equate “Research” with “Google”. (Search Engine Land)

    “Another concern is the accuracy and trustworthiness of content that ranks well in Google and other search engines. Only 40 percent of teachers say their students are good at assessing the quality and accuracy of information they find via online research. And as for the teachers themselves, only five percent say ‘all/almost all’ of the information they find via search engines is trustworthy — far less than the 28 percent of all adults who say the same.”Student researchers-Pew

    Do teachers have a point here? Is it possible that information found via search engines is less than trustworthy, and if so, where do teachers and other serious researchers need to go to find quality information? Deep Web Technologies did a little research of our own to see just how results on Google vs. popular Explorit Everywhere! search engines differs in quality of science sources.

    How Google Works
    Google, and other popular search engines such as Bing and Yahoo, search the surface web for information. The surface web, as opposed to the Deep Web, consists of public websites that are open to crawlers to read the website’s information and store it in a giant database called an index. When a user searches for information, they are actually searching the index of information, not the website itself. The results that are returned are the ones that people seemed to like in the past, or most popular results for the query.  That’s right…the most popular…not necessarily the most relevant information or quality resources.

    We should probably also mention those sneaky ads at the top of the page that look informative, but can be quite deceptive. A JAMA article states this about medical search ads:

    “Many of the ads, the researchers noted, are very informational — with ‘graphs, diagrams, statistics and physician testimonials’ — and therefore not identifiable to patients as promotional material.

    This kind of ‘incomplete and imbalanced information’ is particularly dangerous, they note, because of its deceptively professional appearance: ‘Although consumers who are bombarded by television commercials may be aware that they are viewing an advertisement, hospital websites often have the appearance of an education portal.'”

    Researchers thinking that Google reads their mind and magically returns the right information on the first page of results should think again. The #1 position on a Google results page gets 33% of the traffic, so is a highly sought-after spot on a Google page. Unfortunately, with SEO tricks inflating page-rank on Google and  ads vying for top spot, that number one result, or even the top page of results, may not be entirely germane or even contain much scholarly content. But those results rank high because they’ve worked the Google system. 
    Science.gov, developed and maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information, uses Explorit Everywhere! to search over 60 databases and over 2200 selected websites from 15 federal agencies. The results are from authoritative, government sources, and extraordinarily relevant. When you perform a search on Science.gov, there is no question about the sources you are searching. Explore the difference!

    Whether you are a student or scientist, knowing where to start your science search is very important. In most cases, serious research doesn’t start with Google. A 2014 IDC study shows that only 56% of the time do knowledge workers find the information required to do their jobs. Having the right sources available through an efficient Deep Web search like Explorit Everywhere! is critical to finding significant scientific information and staying ahead of the game.